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Speeches matching topic Government Regulation and speakers whose last name begins with R
Showing 1 - 10 of 11 speeches.
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Democracy and capitalism tend to strengthen each other, across countries and over time, but not always. Dr. Raghuram Rajan describes the peculiar confluence of forces that are causing a wedge between democratic forces and markets today and why this is being expressed in the political movements we see. He argues that to preserve what is good in the global system of trade and finance, we need countries, especially large emerging markets, to step up and take leadership to move the dialogue forward. At the same time, industrial countries have to pay attention to domestic political demands to slow, or reverse, globalization and find ways to make angry citizens less anxious about the future. Dr. Rajan will discuss some policy options that could address these wide-ranging and impactful issues.

U.S. wages are at their lowest level in more than 20 years and workers are growing tired of a stagnant economy. Globalization, coupled with structural economic changes, have created an environment that often rewards capital at a greater rate than it does labor – and workers around the world are, increasingly, saying “enough!” From Brexit to the U.S. election, middle class workers are making their voices heard. Trish Regan examines the policies that need to be enacted now to help change the fate of U.S. workers and strengthen our middle class, while simultaneously encouraging companies to invest in the world’s greatest economy.

Robert Reich (Exclusively WSB)

One of the nation’s most highly respected public leaders and thinkers who has served in three national administrations, Robert Reich brings exceptional knowledge and experience to his presentations to dissect the big economic challenges Washington policy makers are facing today. With wide-sweeping experience and brilliant wit, Reich explains what’s really at stake, which policy choices are likely to be the most (or least) successful and how an increasingly complicated political landscape will impact Washington’s ability to get things done. A renowned economic expert and New York Times best-selling author, Reich has an unequivocal understanding and ability to address the issues that will have major implications for the President and on future elections. 

Robert Reich (Exclusively WSB)

It is likely that in coming years the major fault line will shift from the old right versus left debate over the size of government to a new battle between the establishment and the anti-establishment, who see the game as rigged against them. The anti-establishment forces have been on the losing end of the economy for 30 years. Their wages have stagnated, they have had little or no opportunities for advancement, their jobs are less secure, and they worry their children won’t live as well as they do. Globalization and technological change have made them economic losers. But they’re also becoming aware that the political system that generates the rules of the economic game has been captured by those with sufficient wealth to garner more and more influence over it. So the anti-establishment is opting either for “authoritarian” populism, or for fundamental democratic reforms. The former features anti-immigrant and xenophobic movements that feed on themselves. Only the latter — genuine democratic reform — can possibly deliver what they really need. This is the fundamental choice ahead: authoritarian populism or democratic reform.

Tom Ridge (Exclusively WSB)

The digital sun never sets. It will only get hotter. Every day, through the internet of everything, we generate more data and share more information about ourselves with other individuals, corporations and government. How much access should government have to this information to protect you from criminals, predators and terrorists? Are rights to privacy and security exclusive to one another? Join Tom Ridge, America’s first Secretary of Homeland Security, for this timely discussion about the critical choices we face when technology, civil liberties and security collide.

Alice Rivlin (Exclusively WSB)

It's a fact: Federal spending will rise rapidly in the next few years for Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid. These programs are already more than 40% of federal spending and are rising faster than every other budget line except interest on the debt. Clearly, costs of this kind simply cannot be sustained, and even though health care reform has passed, there are still further political, social and electoral implications. What's the solution? What must be done before three of the country's most important programs become too unwieldy to repair or altogether insolvent? Visionary thinker Alice Rivlin, former vice chair of the Federal Reserve Board tackles the perpetually daunting problem of health care spending with ideas and energy that made her one of the most effective, influential and respected policy makers and economic minds in the country. Navigating the at-times labyrinthine budget process, Rivlin clarifies where the U.S. stands, where it’s headed and what the country needs to do to secure a healthy (and fiscally healthy) future for its citizens.

Alice Rivlin (Exclusively WSB)

What's ahead on the economic horizon? Things seem more than unsettled at the moment: with renewed tension in the Middle East, an unstable housing market and a federal deficit that has increased significantly over the past few years, the implications for the nation's economic health seem muddled and confused and in desperate need of clarification. Alice Rivlin, former vice chair of the Federal Reserve Board and one of the most influential policy makers in Washington, puts her finger on the pulse of the nation's economic health and clarifies the economic clutter to discuss how the latest political and business headlines will shape growth and markets both domestically and internationally.

Christina Romer (Exclusively WSB)

In this presentation, Christina Romer focuses her remarks on the outlook for the U.S. economy and monetary policy both in the near term and over the next few years.  She discusses with audiences current conditions, the outlook for inflation, employment and growth, the debate over secular stagnation and America’s long-run prospects.  A key theme is the uncertainty surrounding the forecasts.  The crisis has upended some key relationships forecasters have traditionally relied upon; and there are many risks to the outlook that are hard to quantify and predict, such as slowing growth in China and possible default in Greece.  Romer addresses the implications of the outlook and uncertainty for monetary policy, focusing on both what the Federal Reserve is likely to do and why uncertainty makes it important for them to move cautiously.

The U.S. economic recovery is gathering momentum. Positives include a recovering housing market, the shale gas and oil revolution, continued monetary accommodation by the Fed, strong corporate profits, the re-shoring of some manufacturing, stronger consumer confidence, a rising stock market and investor optimism in other risk assets, rising job creation and entrepreneurial dynamism. Negatives including policy gridlock and uncertainty in Washington, unresolved fiscal issues (debt ceiling, tax reform), the impact of a stronger dollar, the effects of the likely Fed exit from a zero rate policy; and tail risks from the global economy (possibility of tail risks from the EZ, risk of Chinese hard landing, geopolitical tensions impacting markets).
 

Downside risks include a recurrence of EZ financial stresses, given austerity fatigue and political fragility in the periphery; another fight over the debt ceiling and government shutdown in the U.S; an earlier and more serious hard landing in China; a policy mistake by the Fed if exit from zero rates occurs too  soon or too late; a few systemically important EMs experiencing outright financial/currency/sovereign crisis; geo-political developments in Russia or the Middle East that spook investors.

Upside risks include a further fall in oil prices that boosts global growth, especially in oil importing economies; a U.S. economy that grows faster—well above 3% plus; more resilient growth in China and a smooth rebalancing of its economy; a stronger recovery of the EZ and Japan as QE and weaker currencies boost growth; and an improvement in global risk sentiment that boosts risky asset prices in a significant way. Of all of these upside risks, a positive growth surprise in the U.S. looks like the most likely.

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