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Speeches matching topic Business Growth/Strategy/Trends and speakers whose last name begins with T
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Modern economists act as though economic growth is mysterious and hard to achieve. In fact, nothing could be easier than economic growth. It’s as simple as getting four basic inputs—taxes, regulation, trade and monetary policy—correct. This talk will describe the basics to growth, and then apply them to the present economy to show what is holding it back when it’s slow, and what’s causing it to boom when the economy is soaring.

The prolonged but subdued economic recovery since has raised the question of whether the financial crisis and Great Recession imposed lasting harm on the American economy, or accelerated changes that were already taking place, or have simply lengthened the time it will take to return to pre-crisis norms. In all likelihood, each of these possibilities has some force in explaining current conditions and what we can expect in the future. Daniel Tarullo shares his assessment and explores labor market changes, inflation, productivity trends, financial developments, and other factors that shed light on prospects for the economy.

In an era of hyper-competition and non-stop disruption, the most urgent work for organizations everywhere is the work of making meaningful, deep-seated change. When customers have higher expectations than ever, digital technologies and new business models create more choices than ever, and political and social trends create more turmoil than ever, then familiar strategies and established ways of working are less effective than ever. That means even the most successful companies have to rethink and reimagine every aspect of how they do business and deliver results—building on their past success, as they build out a new perspective on the future. But how do you break new ground when there is so much pressure to avoid mistakes? How do you keep people focused and confident in a world that seems so uncertain? In short, how do you unleash long-lasting, positive change in turbulent, fast-moving times? These are the questions Bill Taylor addresses in his provocative and energizing keynote. His message is designed to help leaders from all walks of life transform their organizations, shake up their industries, and challenge themselves. He brings his message to life with colorful stories of organizations that are unleashing innovations and driving transformations in all sorts of fields—from retail to software, automobiles to financial services, hotels to hospitals. Ultimately, Bill’s message, lessons, and stories amount to a manifesto for change and a manual for achieving it—at a moment when change is the name of the game.

Here are some of the themes he emphasizes:

In a fast-changing world, the most successful organizations embrace strategies that allow them to stand for something special and inspire others to stand with them. Competition is no longer about being the best at what lots of others already do. It’s about being the only one who does what you do. What do you promise that only you can promise? What do you deliver that no one else can deliver? In a ferociously competitive world, ordinary is not an option.

The more things change, the more the worries about change remain the same. That’s why the first job of leaders who are serious about making change is convincing their colleagues (and themselves) that playing it safe is the riskiest course of all. Change beings when individuals and organizations conclude that the risk of trying something new is less than the cost of clinging to the status quo. That a huge shift in mindset, but it’s the mindset that makes a difference.

In a world disrupted by technology, change is about recognizing the power of emotion and psychology. Success is no longer just about price, features, quality—pure economic value. It’s also about passion, emotion, identity—sharing your values. The best organizations don’t just make everything they do more efficient and reliable. They strive to become more memorable to encounter. For change agents and their organizations, it’s just as important to be kind as it is to be clever.

You can’t be serious about changing unless you’re also serious about failing. One big reason so many organizations are slow to change is that they are reluctant to fail. But reimagining how you do business means working with dramatically new technologies, experimenting with different business models, rethinking how you engage with customers—all of which are bound to involve setbacks and disappointments. When it comes to change, failure is an option—because if you’re not failing, you’re not really changing.

In a world being remade before our eyes, leaders who make a difference are the ones who can reimagine what’s possible at their organization and in their field, and who can turn bold strategies into relentless execution. And they’re not just CEOs; they’re executives running business units, managers in charge of key departments, engineers or marketers running project teams, entrepreneurs building a company from scratch. Regardless of their formal role or title in the organization, high-impact leaders exude both originality and utility—provocative thinking that energizes their colleagues, a roll-up-the-sleeves approach to work and culture that shapes how everyone shares ideas and solves problems. Put simply, the best leaders are the most insatiable learners and the most effective communicators. In this inspiring and instructive keynote, Bill Taylor offers hands-on thinking gleaned from the most extraordinary leaders he’s studied over the last 25 years. These leaders have many different personalities and styles, they’ve built very different kinds of companies and organizations, but they’ve all wrestled with the defining questions that face leaders everywhere—questions whose answers amount to a new agenda for leadership. The challenge for leaders today is to help their organizations see things that other organizations don’t see, and do things that other organizations can’t or won’t do. Bill’s insights, stories, and takeaways prepare leaders at every level to master that challenge.

Here are some of the questions Bill asks and answers:

Are you prepared to rethink the conventions of success in your field and the logic of your success as a leader?  The “paradox of expertise” is one of the most dangerous occupational hazards for leaders. Often, the more closely you’ve looked at a field, the longer you’ve been working and succeeding in a field, the more difficult it can be to see new patterns, new prospects, new possibilities. Without intending it, accomplished leaders can let what they know limit what they can imagine.

Are you learning, as an organization and as a leader, as fast as the world is changing? That’s how you overcome the paradox of expertise. Plenty of leaders work hard to make themselves and their organizations more interesting; that’s how you stand out from the crowd. The best leaders work to keep themselves interested—interested in big ideas, interested in small innovations, interested in the enduring mission of the enterprise and all-new ways to bring that mission to life. The best leaders are the most insatiable leaders.

Do you know how to “talk the walk”? Leadership isn’t just about out-thinking the competition, it’s about out-executing the competition as well. That’s why the best leaders work hard to explain, in language that is unique to their field and compelling to their colleagues and customers, why what they do matters and how they expect to win. A leader’s ideas are only as powerful as the organization’s capacity to bring those ideas to life.

Are you as humble as you are hungry? In businesses built on new ideas, generating and evaluating ideas has to be everybody’s business. That’s why the best leaders are both ambitious for their organizations and humble about their ability to do everything that matters. Indeed, humility in the service of ambition is the most effective mindset for leaders who aspire to do big things in a world with huge unknowns. The best leaders create the conditions that allow ordinary people to make extraordinary contributions.

There has never been a more exciting time to be an entrepreneur, whether it’s building a company from a blank sheet of paper, launching or investing in a franchise, or starting something new inside an established organization. In the old world of business, the strong took from the weak.  If you had the deepest pockets, the biggest factories or labs, the best-known brands, you won by virtue of your power. In the new world of business, the smart take from the strong. The most successful entrepreneurs don’t try to out-compete their bigger rivals; they redefine the terms of competition by embracing one-of-a-kind ideas in a world filled with me-too thinking. Thanks to the revolutions in computing, communications, and social media, along with an explosion of new business models and new sources of financing, smaller and smaller groups of people can do bigger and bigger things. In this provocative and pragmatic keynote targeted to entrepreneurs, small-business leaders, and franchise owners and operators, Bill Taylor offers a set of principles and a collection of case studies drawn from some of the world’s most successful company-builders: founders of small banks, restaurants, retailers, consumer-product companies, software firms, franchises, even a parking garage. These hard-charging entrepreneurial leaders are winning big by changing the game in their fields. Bill offers a new business plan for entrepreneurial growth, and hands-on advice for turning goals into results.

Among the themes he emphasizes:

Originality is the litmus test of entrepreneurial strategy. The best entrepreneurs figure out how their products and services can stand out from the crowd—even as the crowd gets bigger, better, and noisier all the time. They have a definition of success for their business that allows them to stand for something special and inspires customers to stand with them.

The best entrepreneurial companies work as distinctively as they compete.  You can’t create something special and compelling in the marketplace unless you also create something special and compelling in the workplace. For entrepreneurial companies, “who we are” as an energetic and nimble organizations is as important as “what we sell.” They don’t just think differently from everyone else, they can care more than everyone else—about customers, about partners, about the community.

Small gestures can send big signals—and create huge value. One of the virtues or being small, nimble, and agile, is that it allows entrepreneurial companies to be more than just efficient or reliable. It allows them to be memorable to encounter, to create emotional and psychological relationships with their customers that separate them from bigger, more bureaucratic rivals. That’s why entrepreneurs who aspire to do big things don’t lose sight of the small things that make such a huge impression inside and outside the organization.

The smartest entrepreneurs get the best contributions from the most people. It may be lonely at the top, but entrepreneurship is not a game best played by loners. These days, the most powerful contributions often come from the most unexpected places—the hidden genius inside your company, the quiet genius of colleagues who are easy to overlook. That’s why real entrepreneurial geniuses don’t pretend to know everything. They understand that their job is to get the best ideas from the most people—whomever and wherever those people may be.

Linda Kaplan Thaler is sought the world over to address a wide range of audiences, from Fortune 500 companies and leading tech companies to universities and educational groups, to international trade associations and beyond. She speaks on a variety of topics, including but not limited to:

  • Leadership
  • The Power of Nice and How to Conquer the Business World with Kindness
  • How to Go from Grit to Great
  • Motivation
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Women’s Issues in the Marketplace
  • Branding
  • How to Develop Your Creative Spirit
  • The Importance of Humor in the Workplace

Our customized game show, complete with an over-the-top host and competitive contestants, is a great way to convey some interesting facts and insights about your company, new products, or internal process changes. This 45-60 minute show has an open format & we can even use your executives or guests to show off their knowledge on the unique details of the industry (think “name that acronym” or “buzzword bingo”).

Joe Theismann (Exclusively WSB)

In his charismatic and entertaining style, Joe Theismann draws parallels between his successful career as an NFL quarterback and YOU—the executive, manager, salesperson, group, or individual—with the goal of Managing to Win! He knows and understands that good management and effective leadership is not a game of follow the leader: It is about PEOPLE—listening to them... trusting them... and motivating individuals to take ownership of team goals. By example, Joe Theismann shows that an effective leader cares about and trusts subordinates and demonstrates it by empowering individuals to take risks in order to perform above levels that have become comfortable.

Joe Theismann (Exclusively WSB)

This dynamic presentation outlines the game plan that brought Joe Theismann success both on and off the football field. Former NFL MVP quarterback and Super Bowl champion, he reveals his Game Plan for Success by drawing parallels between winning in football and in business. Joe Theismann focuses on how to succeed under pressure—when it's "4th and 1"—and how to adapt quickly to unexpected situations—when you're faced with a "blitz" instead of a "zone." He urges individuals and organizations to set goals and correct errors each step of the way, an approach that builds momentum, which, once on your side, would be hard for even the best "defense" to stop!

Disruptive innovation is happening all around us in almost every industry. “Disruptive Innovation” can mean: disrupting your competitors, customer relationships, internal processes, reward systems, management strategy, the status quo and “last century thinking”. But how do you create a culture of innovation that enables a big company to think and act like a small one? Mark shares insights on world-class companies that struggled with change—some that failed to adjust to meet changing markets and others that reinvented their business models and transformed entire industries with disruptive innovations. Mark answers several questions that will help you understand how to:

  • Enable your teams to not only embrace change, but lead business transformation
  • Operationalize innovation while still meeting the demands of Wall Street
  • Remove the fear of failure for disruptive ideas
  • Create incentive systems that reward those that challenge “business as usual”
  • Empower employees at every level to make change happen

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