Search Results

Speeches matching topic Leadership and speakers whose last name begins with E
Showing 1 - 10 of 14 speeches.
Previous Page
of 2 Next Page

Take a Hollywood producer, a NY professor, a fine artist and a hacker with a criminal record…put them together and what do you get? A device that helped a paralyzed man create drawings using only the movement of his eyes. Collaboration comes in many forms—some of them unexpected. In this talk, Mick Ebeling discusses the tools necessary to become a stellar collaborator, and to recognize the traits of collaboration-worthy individuals for your next big idea.

Mickey Edwards has been a part of—and a student of—America’s political system, first from the outside, as a partisan party leader and conservative political activist; then, from deep within the system itself, as a senior member of Congress, a member of the congressional leadership and an advisor to Presidents, and then from the outside again, as an award-winning lecturer at Harvard and Princeton, a political columnist and broadcaster, and a mentor to a new generation of public officeholders. It has been a unique vantage point, one matched by no other observer of American politics, and that combination of perspectives has led to a series of breathtaking proposals not to replace one party with another, or replace some officials with others, but to change the entire political system from top to bottom, creating a system that recaptures what America’s founders intended: a government in which the voice of the people is actually heard; a system in which, within the bounds of the Constitution, the people themselves control the levers of government.

What Edwards proposes is a far-reaching change in how campaigns are funded, eradicating the ability of political insiders to limit voters’ choices by controlling who can be on the ballot, and depriving parties of the right to shape congressional districts for their own advantage, undermining the Founders’ vision of truly representative government.

Edwards’ proposals have stirred a national political movement through his book, The Parties Versus the People: How to Turn Republicans and Democrats into Americans, a movement that has been fueled by groundbreaking articles in The Atlantic, Daedalus, The New York Times, and other major publications. As the St. Louis Post-Dispatch wrote in an editorial: “The man widely credited with helping the open primary proposal gain steam nationally is former Rep. Mickey Edwards ... who advocated for both redistricting and primary reform in his 2012 book ... This should be Missouri’s future ... Neither major political party likes these ideas. Why? It takes the primaries out of their hands and puts the power where it belongs, with the people.”  

Edwards’ arguments have changed the national debate about the extreme control political parties exercise over our political system—arguments heard on television broadcasts as diverse as Charlie Rose, the PBS NewsHour and Bill Moyers, and on outlets ranging from CNN and NPR to MSNBC and Al Jazeera, and before audiences ranging from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences to trade associations and from labor unions to college campuses.  

Nobody has had a better, or more comprehensive, close-up view of American conservatism—and how it has changed—than Mickey Edwards. He was a leader in Barry Goldwater’s grassroots campaign to reshape the Republican Party, national vice chairman for the Young Republicans when they formed the conservative core of the party’s activist base, national chairman of the American Conservative Union, chairman of the Conservative Political Action Conference, one of three founding trustees of the conservative Heritage Foundation, a conservative staffer for Republican members of Congress, and director of the Reagan presidential campaign’s joint House-Senate policy advisory committees. It was Edwards who hit the campaign trail for Reagan, was with him in his hotel room in New Hampshire when he won that state’s pivotal presidential primary, and later intervened with fellow conservatives to bridge the gap between movement activists and Reagan’s Vice President, and later President, George H. W. Bush. And it was Edwards who helped shape the Republican National Convention platform for the Reagan campaign.

But what conservatism was then and what it is now are very different animals. As Edwards wrote in his book, Reclaiming Conservatism: How a Great American Political Movement Got Lost—and How It Can Find Its Way Back, published by Oxford University Press, people who call themselves conservatives today support positions that earlier conservatives would have marched on Washington to protest, including government surveillance of citizens and defense of corporate abuse (earlier conservatives championed small business and market competition). In his devastating critique, Edwards cites dramatic changes in Republican Party platforms as the party and its conservative movement have begun more and more to represent the antithesis of what they once stood for. Neither Goldwater, conservative’s 1964 choice for President, nor Reagan, their choice in 1980, could win a Republican primary today, Edwards claims. As for himself, he points to a study by a political science professor who found that Edwards, once chairman of the American Conservative Union, with a 100 percent conservative rating, and one of the most conservative members of Congress for 16 years, would be one of the more liberal Republicans in Congress today if he voted exactly the same way.

But Edwards does not know modern conservatism only through an activist lens. When he left Congress after 16 years, during which he was an acknowledged conservative leader, he continued to write from a conservative viewpoint in weekly newspaper columns in The Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune and Boston Herald, and in a weekly broadcast on NPR’s All Things Considered (his Los Angeles column was entitled “On the Right”). At the same time, he introduced a new class on American conservatism at Harvard, where he had begun a teaching career that lasted 16 years at Harvard, Princeton, George Washington University and Georgetown. The course examined every aspect of American conservatism (distinguishing it from European and Asian conservatism; American conservatism at its root was originally similar to the European liberalism of John Locke, with its emphasis on individual rights and freedoms). Edwards taught about conservatism by looking at both policy and theory, introducing students to the work of Hayek, Von Mises, Friedman, Churchill, Burke, Buckley, Kirk, Irving Kristol, and other voices of the early conservative movement.

The heart of Edwards’ argument is that what passes for conservatism today is not that at all, but a hodgepodge of big government and anti-government, liberty and state control, populism and elitism, limited government and military adventurism. It is an argument he has taken all over the country, on campuses, through the airwaves, and in newspaper and magazine articles. It is not an attack on conservative ideas but an attempt to reclaim them and to recapture the title from those who have usurped the name of the movement without even a rudimentary understanding of its principles.  

Mickey Edwards spent most of his congressional career in the field of international affairs as the ranking member of the House Subcommittee on Foreign Operations, official observer of numerous overseas elections, a contributor to magazines on international affairs, speaker at the U.S. Naval Academy and the U.S. Military Academy, advisor to the U.S. State Department under Secretary Colin Powell, and foreign policy advisor to George W. Bush’s presidential campaign. Edwards was a leader in Congress’s support for the first Gulf War but has been a frequent critic of America’s seeming insistence on inserting itself into difficulties wherever they occur around the world: not a pacifist and not an isolationist—he has written persuasively for America’s role as a promoter of human rights and liberal democracy and believes the U.S. needs to be more deliberate about when and where it intrudes on the international stage.

The Constitution places almost every major power of the federal government—over war, taxes, spending, treaties, judicial appointments, creating or ending public programs, even determining who may sit in the President’s Cabinet. And yet, Mickey Edwards, a former member of the congressional leadership during 16 years in the House, argues that today’s Congress repeatedly fails to meet its constitutional obligations, criticizing presidential overreaching but doing nothing to assert its own authority as a maker of laws and overseer of the executive branch. If impeachment is to be considered, Edwards argues, maybe it is the Congress that should be impeached.

The Dilemma: While most leaders understand their most reliable competitive advantage comes from their people, few know how to get their teams “all in”—convincing employees to buy into the strategy they’ve put forward. If a culture is clear, positive, and strong, then people will believe what they do matters and that they can make a difference. If a culture is dysfunctional—chaotic, combative or indifferent—employees will spend more time thinking about why the people sitting next to them should be fired than getting fired up themselves.

The Research: Teaming up with research giant Towers Watson, #1 best-selling author Chester Elton presents the findings of an unprecedented 300,000-person study conducted in the worst of the recession for his book All In. Based on this breakthrough research and his extensive consulting experience with a who’s-who of successful organizations, he presents a simple roadmap that all managers can follow to create a high-achieving culture in their own teams where employees are engaged, enabled and energized.

The Result: Elton offers specific how-tos for each step, and tells fascinating stories of leaders in action that vividly depict just how these powerful methods can be implemented. Audiences will learn: the 3 research-based characteristics of the world’s most profitable, productive organizational and team cultures; the 7 steps today’s most successful leaders use to generate buy-in; and how managers at any level can build a productive workgroup culture of their own where employees commit to the culture and give an extra push of effort.

The Dilemma: For leaders looking to drive innovation, diversity, and inclusion in their teams, many established management practices are doing more harm than good. Too many leaders are dampening their employees’ exuberance and refreshing diversity with old-school management approaches that are killing their cultures.

The Research: Chester Elton has been one of the most influential voices in leadership research and organizational consulting for more than two decades, but it’s his research over the last few years that’s garnering extra attention. After surveying more than 14,000 working adults in 2015-16 alone, he has found 5 principles of effective leadership that managers in the 21st Century can employ to great effect, and 5 principles that must be avoided.

The Result: In a fresh, funny and challenging keynote presentation, Elton debunks myths such as The Smartest Person in the Room, Treating Everyone the Same is Fair, Appreciation Comes in a Paycheck, and We’ll Let You Know if You Mess Up. He teaches audiences how to lead in such a way that today’s employees will follow—including establishing a clear future vision, enhancing diversity, increasing trust levels, and providing opportunity and growth development paths.

(also available as a joint presentation with Adrian Gostick)

The Dilemma: The vast majority of employees’ days are now spent working collaboratively, but still 96 percent of executives cite poor teamwork as the main source of workplace failures in their organizations. It might be the most-pressing question organizations must address: How can managers lead their teams to improved performance given the volatility and challenges we face today?

The Research: Based on an 850,000-person study of the most profitable, innovative work teams, New York Times bestselling author Chester Elton introduces audiences to the new science of teamwork—helping leaders deal with the increased speed of change in business, global and remote employees, the rise of the Millennials, the need to work more cross-functionally across departments, and more.

The Result: Elton’s research has discovered a set of leadership disciplines that make the biggest difference in building today’s best teams. He helps leaders:

• Manage to the One—Identify the drivers of each team member for maximum engagement
• Speed Productivity—Help new people and teams work faster & smarter
• Challenge Everything—Inspire greater innovation through healthy debate
• Focus on Customers—Build bridges across functions, cultures, and distance

 

You are a mind reader, born with an extraordinary ability to understand what others think, feel, believe, want and know. It’s a sixth sense you use each day in every professional and personal relationship—but how well do you really know what your coworkers, employees, competitors or customers want or are thinking? In this high-energy, illuminating presentation, Nicholas Epley takes the audience on an exploration of one of the great mysteries of the human mind. How good are you at knowing the minds of others? How well can you guess what others think of you, know who really likes you or tell when others are lying? How well do you really understand the minds of those closest to you at work or at home? Why are we sometimes blind to the minds of others? Why do we sometimes talk to our cars, or the stars, as if there is a mind that can hear us? Why do we so routinely believe that others think, feel and want what we do, when in fact they do not? And, why we do we believe we understand our fellow workers, customers, competitors, spouses, family and friends so much better than we actually do? While Epley’s presentation will not turn others into open books, it will give you the wisdom to revolutionize how you think about them—and yourself.

Understanding why people buy what they buy, think what they think, and act as they do requires understanding how those people evaluate the world through their own eyes and from their own inside perspective.  One reason companies misunderstand their consumers, leaders misunderstand their followers, and managers misunderstand their clients is because they inherently evaluate other people from an outside perspective. In this presentation, Epley addresses what behavioral scientists have learned about these two differing perspectives, describes how they create systematic misunderstanding between people, and shares with audiences how you can align your perspective with others to understand them better in both your professional as well as personal life.

Showing 1 - 10 of 14 speeches.
Previous Page
of 2 Next Page
Refine Your Results By:

Leadership
  • Achievement - Business
  • Achievement - Personal
  • Africa
  • American Politics
  • Asia
  • Big Data
  • Biotechnology
  • Branding
  • Business Growth/Strategy/Trends
  • Change: Living with It
  • Change: Managing/Leading It
  • China
  • Communication Skills
  • Consumer Trends
  • Corporate Culture
  • Courage
  • Creativity
  • Current Events
  • Customer Relationships/Loyalty
  • Design
  • Diversity
  • Education
  • Election Forecast/Analysis
  • Ethics
  • Europe
  • Foreign Policy - U.S.
  • Government Regulation
  • Human Resource Issues
  • Human Rights
  • Information Technology
  • Innovation
  • Inspiring Lives
  • Latin America
  • Leadership
  • Middle East
  • Motivation
  • Negotiation
  • Overcoming Obstacles and Challenges
  • Patriotism
  • Peak Performance
  • Personal Growth
  • Philanthropy
  • Sales Skills and Motivation
  • Social Media/New Media
  • Sustainability
  • Teamwork
  • Workforce Issues

Select a Type
  • Adventurers/Explorers
  • Athlete
  • Author
  • Entrepreneur
  • Extreme Athletes
  • Female
  • Futurist
  • Male
  • Mountain Climbers
  • Philanthropist
  • TED
  • Top Executives
  • University Professor

Select a Fee Range*
  • $15,000 and Under*
  • $15,001 - $25,000*
  • $25,001 - $40,000*
  • $40,001 and Up*

Select a Way To Connect
  • Breakout Session
  • Joint Presentation
  • Keynote Address
  • Panel

Select a Specialty
  • 15k & Under
  • For After Dinner
  • For Associations
  • For Commencement
  • For Community Lecture Programs
  • For Conference Closers/Openers
  • For Corporations
  • For Facing Challenge
  • For Fund-Raisers
  • For Global Events
  • For Government Audiences
  • For High Achievers
  • For High Energy Speakers
  • For Institutional Investors
  • For International Audiences
  • For New Managers
  • For On Campus
  • For Senior Management Groups
  • To Motivate Sales Professionals

Select a Location
  • California
  • Illinois
  • Massachusetts
  • Minnesota
  • New Jersey
  • Washington
  • Washington, D.C.
Search Within Your Results:

* Fees vary based on event location.

Start a New Search: